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Nakto Camel Electric Bicycle

Nakto Camel Electric BicycleDid you know that you can get an e-bike for under a thousand dollars? Yep, this Nakto Camel Electric Bicycle retails for $600 and I’ve seen it cheaper on Amazon. Crazy, right? I predict that we are going to see more and more e-bikes on the road because A-they are super practical and B-they are even more fun than they are practical.

I’m new to electric bikes, having just tried out my first one a month ago. Now I’m completely hooked. There are tons of hills where I live–big hills. That makes me think twice about riding my bike somewhere for transportation, especially if it’s downhill on the way out and uphill on the way home. With an e-bike, it’s a non-issue. If I have the energy, I can pedal, if I need some help, I can hit the pedal-assist. Brilliant.

The pedal assist works by turning the throttle on the right handlebar grip. Hitting the brakes makes it stop right away, so I don’t feel like the bike is going to run away with me. If you can ride a bike, you can ride this. The Nakto Camel Electric Bicycle comes with a lot of extras like the rack on the back, a wire front basket, bike bell, and a headlight. The headlight is cheaply made in my opinion, but the rest of the bike is surprisingly nice for that price point. This would be a great way to get your feet wet in the e-bike world, or to get for ground transportation for boaters and RV-ers.

The Nakto Camel Electric Bicycle comes in a box partially assembled and you have to finish it. It’s pretty straight forward and this video is a helpful step by step guide. I did it by myself, I was a little nervous since it’s electric, but I managed. If you have any doubts at all, I would take it to your local bike shop, but I’ve assembled several regular bikes so I felt pretty confident.

Nakto Camel Electric Bicycle

I’m really happy with this bike, it’s a lot of fun to ride, and it’s a practical transportation option. A couple of drawbacks are–it’s heavy. At 65 lbs, that’s too heavy for me to take up and down stairs for example. The other thing is rain. I live in a rainy climate and it’s recommended that you don’t ride it in the rain. Both of those things I can manage by timing my rides appropriately, and by storing my bike in a covered shed.

Nakto keeps costs down by producing its bikes in China and shipping directly to the consumer, cutting out the middle man. There is an 800 number on the website that you can call and talk to a real person if you have any questions or need help with assembly. I think it’s a lot of bang for the buck and would recommend it as an entry level e-bike. Just getting started with these myself, I can’t imagine what other bells and whistles you would need (other than a lighter weight version). Find the Nakto Camel Electric Bicycle HERE.